Archives for the month of: February, 2016

The first thing I discovered is that most glues do not stick to silicone, so I played with elastic instead.  There was also an attempt at making a flexible rod out of ABS.

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slide31We may be sending our designs to shapeways in the end, thus working in metal is in the realm of possibility.  There exist many metal splint designs such as above.  In my initial ideation I am utterly torn between form and function- for example I’d like to do something involving silicone padding, but have it still be quite elegant.  We’ll see what I come up with.

In the mean time, here are a bunch of ring and jewelry designs I adore:

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 	Photographed by Tom DuBrock.  	  	Exhibited in The Lester and Sue Smith Gem Vault at the Houston Museum of Natural Science from November 16, 2007 through February 17, 2008 as part of the show, "Verdura: The Life and Work of a Master Jeweler."

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For our 2nd assignment, we are to create a flexible splint for a burn victim who has trouble keeping his index finger straight, it is default coiled.  His skin is extremely sensitive, so we must be careful with our designs- nonetheless we can approach it as a decorative jewelry object.  It should utilize spring or elastic to keep open, and be as low profile as possible- the ability to fit his hands in his pockets is something he is looking for.

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We tried out a few of these in class.  This one (below) was fairly light weight and nifty, though lacked a mechanism to keep it snug on the finger:

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In terms of feel and flexibility, this one is hard to top.  It may be difficult to keep things low profile when clunky designs such as this one seem so effective:

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When first coming up with the sensory hair idea, I was like- what if I they were made of metal? (=YEA!) (via shapeways, etc)

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For the next iteration, I created the ‘exoskeleton’ that wraps around the face.  In this instance, I overcompensated and gave the hairs way too much room and they barely touch the face.  This was more of a test run as I wasn’t sure if I even had the right thickness of material, or how well it would fit the face (it fits me ok, others, not so much)- in the end I ran out of time.  Learned a lot, though..

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To get the setae to sit against my face, we used a 3D scan…

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It was difficult to create an organic shape on top of an organic shape (face).  By the end of this assignment I probably had 100 different guidelines.  My first test was too tight, the hairs could barely move:

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A good samaritan classmate helped me 3D print some setae to test out size/shape of the hair and it’s base.  I AM ECSTATIC over my first 3D print, it’s wonderful to have a design take shape as material object!

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The flesh colored ABS I bought is a little unnerving- I thought it would be shiny but it’s not so it actually kind of looks like skin.  An insect exoskeleton is rigid and armor-like, (and sheer, shiny) so I thought it would be interesting to have an exoskeleton colored the same way as soft skin- now I’m not so sure, maybe a translucent filament would be better.

In an ideal world, I’m able to create complex biological forms in rhino, but we’ll see- this project will give me an idea of what’s possible.

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Some sketches:

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Still trying to figure out the best design for the setae such that they actually stimulate the skin  when moved.  A hinge would be cool but difficult.  Also, if there’s time (there’s not), I would like to cast the base of each seta in silicone, to create a nice texture against the face.

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In the insect, sensory hairs transduce mechanical motion into electrical signals, which are relayed to their tiny brains.
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..even fruit flies have brains: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_animals_by_number_of_neurons

 

After MUCH thought I’ve abandoned visual for tactile- I will create a mask inspired by insect exoskeletons, with moveable ‘sensory hairs’ pressed against the face.   Insects are covered with numerous barbs/hairs called setae, some of which have sensory purposes.  Their exoskeleton is formed out of a resin-like protein called chitin.  When imaged with the scanning electron microscope, the exoskeleton can look as if made of opaque plastic- because of this I’ve been dying to 3D print forms inspired by electron microscopy.

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from bryazoa.net:

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